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Van Jacobson
PARC
A New Way to look at Networking
on: Google Video
Today's research community congratulates itself for the success of the internet and passionately argues whether circuits or datagrams are the One True Way. Meanwhile the list of unsolved problems grows. Security, mobility, ubiquitous computing, wireless, autonomous sensors, content distribution, digital divide, third world infrastructure, etc., are all poorly served by what's available from either the research community or the marketplace. I'll use various strained analogies and contrived examples to argue that network research is moribund because the only thing it knows how to do is fill in the details of a conversation between two applications. Today as in the 60s problems go unsolved due to our tunnel vision and not because of their intrinsic difficulty. And now, like then, simply changing our point of view may make many hard things easy.

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3.0/5 (5831 votes)
Video format: flv       Time: 1:21:14
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Paul Davies
Imperial College
Black Holes, Wormholes and Time Travel
on: The Vega Science Trust
The idea of time travel makes great science fiction, but can it really be achieved? Paul Davies, visiting Professor in Physics at Imperial College, describes wormholes in space and other ways that might allow travel into the past or future.

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3.0/5 (4792 votes)
Video format: rm       Time: 59:10:00
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Phil Smith

The Teacher Scientist's Network
on: sciencelive
Dr Phil Smith chats to Charlotte about the Young Persons Programme here at the festival. The programme was organised by Teacher Scientist network, who aim to promote one on one interaction between teachers and scientist and provide more practical science experiments for children in schools. If you'd like to know more about Teacher Scientist network, look at www.tsn.org.uk.

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3.0/5 (3894 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 10:32
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Guido van Rossum
Google
Python 3000
on: Google Video
The next major version of Python, nicknamed Python 3000 (or more prosaically Python 3.0), has been anticipated for a long time. For years I have been collecting and exploring ideas that were too radical for Python 2.x, and it's time to stop dreaming and start coding. In this talk I will present the community process that will be used to complete the specification for Python 3000, as well as some of the major changes to the language and the remaining challenges. Guido van Rossum is a computer programmer who is best known as the author and Benevolent Dictator for Life of the Python programming language.

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3.0/5 (5708 votes)
Video format: flv       Time: 1:08:41
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Matthew Roughan
University of Adelaide
Privacy Preserving DataMining
on: Google TechTalks
The rapid growth of the Internet over the last decade has been startling. However, efforts to track its growth have often fallen afoul of bad data --- for instance, how much traffic does the Internet now carry? The problem is not that the data is technically hard to obtain, or that it does not exist, but rather that the data is not shared.

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3.0/5 (4183 votes)
Video format: rm       Time: 1 hour
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Congjun Wu
Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics
Exploring New States of Matter in the p-Orbital Bands of Optical Lattices
on: Kavli Institute
In this talk, we will present new features of orbital physics in the p-orbital bands with bosons and fermions, which are not usually realized in solid state systems. These include quantum stripe ordering of orbital angular momentum moments in the triangular lattice, Wigner crystallization of neutral atoms in the flat band of the honeycomb lattice, and frustrated superfluidity with time-reversal symmetry breaking in the double-well lattice. Signatures of these new states in the time of flight experiments will be discussed.

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3.0/5 (3865 votes)
Video format: rm       Time: 55:00:00
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Christine Kalamina

Addressing Gender and Legal Dimensions in HIV/AIDS, Part One
on: World Bank
As much as HIV/AIDS is about treatment and prevention, it is also about the second-order effects that precipitate its spread, such as gender disparities.

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3.0/5 (5698 votes)
Video format: rm       Time: 121 min
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Will Noel
Walters Art Museum
The Archimedes Palimpsest
on: Google Video
The Archimedes Palimpsest is a 10th Century medieval manuscript that is the subject of an ongoing technical, scientific and conservation effort at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland. Since 1999, the multidisciplinary team has been disbinding, conserving, imaging, analyzing, transcribing and studying the 174 parchment folios - yielding approximately 400Gb of data to date.

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3.0/5 (6784 votes)
Video format: flv       Time: 1 hr 4 min 4 sec
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Julie Ahringer

Genes, worms and the new genetics
on: A Royal Society
A surprising finding over the past 20 years is that all animals have many of the same genes and that they use them in similar ways to grow and develop. Now that we know the complete DNA sequences of several animals, we can see for example that 60% of genes in the small worm C elegans have a human counterpart. These similarities mean that much of what is learned about what genes do in simple animals such as worms can help us understand what human genes do. Using a remarkable new technique called RNA interference (RNAi), we can quickly test the function of individual genes. In this lecture Julie discussed how she has applied the RNAi technique to worm genes to ask for the first time what most of the genes in an animal do. Extending these approaches to other animals is speeding up the rate of biological discovery and understanding.

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3.0/5 (4199 votes)
Video format: windows media / real video       Time:
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Marc Andreessen

Distinguished Innovator Lecture Series: Marc Andreessen
on: UC Berkeley Webcasts
Marc Andreessen is Chairman and Co-founder of Opsware Inc., the leading provider of data center automation software. Marc is widely recognized for his role in launching the Internet revolution in 1993, with his creation of the Mosaic browser while at the University of Illinois. After graduation, Marc co-founded Netscape Communications, and played a critical role in the company's hypergrowth. Andreessen later became CTO of AOL when the company purchased Netscape in 1999.

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3.0/5 (3889 votes)
Video format:       Time: 0:50:51
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Barton Zweibach
MIT
String Theory for Pedestrians Part I
on: CERN
In this 3-lecture series I will discuss the basics of string theory, some physical applications, and the outlook for the future. I will begin with the main concepts of the classical theory and the application to the study of cosmic superstrings. Then I will turn to the quantum theory and discuss applications to the investigation of hadronic spectra and the recently discovered quark-gluon plasma. I will conclude with a sketch of string models of particle physics and showing some avenues that may lead to a complete formulation of string theory.

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3.0/5 (4786 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 1:07:09
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Ray Villard
STScl
The Scorecard on Extrasolar Planets
on: Hubble Public Talks


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3.0/5 (4267 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 59:21:00
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Sally Baliunas
Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
Monsters, Dwarfs, and Everything in Between
on: WGBH Forum
Inside the nucleus of an atom, the laws of quantum mechanics successfully describe the domain of the incredibly small. Yet the same laws influence the very large, including such objects as stars. Lowell Lecture #3.

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3.0/5 (4826 votes)
Video format: rm       Time: 55:56:00
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Michael Brakespear
University of Sydney
Unpacking the brain into multiscale space: Methods, evidence and models
on: California Insitute for Telecommunications, the Science Network


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3.0/5 (6199 votes)
Video format: rm       Time:
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Edward Goldwyn

Interview
on: The Vega Science Trust
Fred Sanger is often considered the father of modern biology, and is one of the few people to have been awarded two Nobel prizes. Working in Cambridge he developed a new chromatographic method fo determining amino-acid end-groups. His new chromatographic results on the free amino groups of insulin were published in 1945 and the complete sequence of insulin in 1955.

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3.0/5 (5236 votes)
Video format: rm       Time: 20:52
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Larry Witham
reporter, writer
Measure of God: Can We Reconcile Science and Religion?
on: WGBH Forum
Journalist and author Larry Witham explores the tension between science and religion that lies at the heart of contemporary debates on stem cell research, cloning, and teaching evolution in the school curriculum.

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3.0/5 (4404 votes)
Video format: rm       Time: 1:07:16
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Daniela Maurer
Binder
The New CO2 incubators with hot air sterilization
on: Biocompare
Our CO2 incubators simulate natural conditions, where many perfect details make up the sum total. We also fuse together the details by amalgamating the growth parameters such as CO2, temperature and humidity into a finely tuned interaction that we call natural simulation. This is a process that we have developed and patented, unparalleled in our industry and the closest thing to natural conditions.

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3.0/5 (5727 votes)
Video format: qt       Time: 6:00
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Magellan's Venus
on: SciVee.com
Astronomers remember Magellan's astounding photos of Venus.

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3.0/5 (3467 votes)
Video format: flv       Time: 3 min, 28 sec
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Daniel Wilson

How to Survive a Robot Uprising' - Daniel H. Wilson speaks at Google
on: Google Video
Daniel H. Wilson discusses his book 'How to Survive a Robot Uprising: Tips On Defending Yourself Against the Coming Rebellion'. This video is part of the Google Author Series - filmed at Google headquarters in Mountain View, CA and is part of the Authors@Google series.

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3.0/5 (4537 votes)
Video format: flv       Time: 44 min
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Dudley Herschbach
Harvard University
Science on the Edge: Research Faculty Symposium
on: Harvard University
Professor Dudley Herschbach moderates a discussion among 5 distinguished Harvard scientists on their research in cancer treatment, artificial intelligence, Genomics, controlling the speed of light and bio-diversity.

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3.0/5 (4461 votes)
Video format: qt,mw,rm       Time: 45 minutes
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Jim Nickerson
APCT
Energy Crisis Management - new ultracapacitor technology
on: Google TechTalks
A new ultracapacitor technology from APCT (US-Ukrainian start-up) provides an efficient, low cost means of managing power delivery for applications ranging from hand held devices to hybrid vehicles and power generating systems of all types. When integrated into battery powered devices, the APCT technology can extend battery life by as much as 400%, lowering the cost of batteries and reducing hazardous waste streams.

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3.0/5 (5784 votes)
Video format: rm       Time: 54 minutes
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E. O. Wilson
Harvard University
E. O. Wilson - The Coming Synergism Between Science and the Humanities
on: Google Video
Scientist and author Edward O.Wilson, draws on studies from a broad spectrum of disciplines to show how various fields of inquiry, and especially the humanities and sciences, intersect with each other. According to Wilson, 'the greatest enterprise of the mind has always been and always will be the attempted linkage of the sciences and the humanities.' Series: Frontiers of Knowledge

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3.0/5 (3528 votes)
Video format: flv       Time: 59 minutes
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Hal Whitehead
Dalhousie University
Society and Culture of the Sperm Whale
on: WGBH Forum
Dr. Whitehead has been studying sperm whales for more than 20 years,

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3.0/5 (4120 votes)
Video format: rm       Time: 57:37:00
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Cosmology at YearlyKos Science Panel, Part 1

Speaker: Sean Carroll
Time: 9:46

The first half of Sean Carroll's talk on Dark Matter, Dark Energy, and the meaning of science at the YearlyKos Science Panel, August 2007.

 



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