Log In | Sign Up   


 

    Psychology

Peter Naish
Open University
Hypnosis- myth or miracle
on: sciencelive
Peter Naish, a lecturer in psychology for the Open University, joins Greg in the studio to talk about one of his research interests: hypnosis. He is an experienced hypnotist and has served and an expert witness in court for cases involving hypnosis. Here he talks about the science behind it - satisfy your curiousity once and for all, and see two willing volunteers being hypnotised on camera, and thier reactions to the expereince.

  • Currently 3.01/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (4545 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 32:09
Send link to a friend



Ed Chi
PARC
Augmenting Social Cognition: From Social Foraging to Social Sensemaking
on: Google TechTalks
The emergence of Social Web has resulted in a spectrum of collaborative information environments. We are interested in understanding the emerging behavior in social software, particularly how they enable social search, foraging and sensemaking.

  • Currently 3.01/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (4508 votes)
Video format: flv       Time:
Send link to a friend



Anat Biegon
Brookhaven National Laboratory
Of Boys and Girls and Bumps on the Head - 414th Brookhaven Lecture, by Anat Biegon
on: Brookhaven National Laboratory
Although it has been well documented that gender affects the prevalence of disorders such as depression and Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, recent head injury trials suggest that both age and sex affect the likelihood and degree of recovery from injuries to the brain. While girls are more likely to die following a traumatic brain injury than boys, that result is reversed after the age of 50, when men die twice as often. April 19, 2006

  • Currently 3.00/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (5083 votes)
Video format: rm       Time: 60 minutes
Send link to a friend





Brain Damage, Smoking Habits Linked
on: Discovery Channel
A small study of stroke victims shows how damage to a certain section of the brain could actually help people kick their cigarette habits.

  • Currently 3.00/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (6664 votes)
Video format: flv       Time: 2:31
Send link to a friend





The Skinny on Smooching
on: Discovery Channel
Ever wonder why we kiss? Discovery News looks into one theory that explains it. Produced by James Williams.

  • Currently 3.00/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (4718 votes)
Video format: flv       Time: 3:31
Send link to a friend



Chris Budd
Bath University
Card tricks
on:
After an excellent lecture, Professor Chris Budd of Bath University joins Greg in the studio for a bit of light-hearted relief. Beware when playing cards with a mathematician...all is not as it seems!

  • Currently 3.00/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (4659 votes)
Video format: Quicktime       Time: 16:00
Send link to a friend



Barry Schwartz
Swarthmore College
The Paradox of Choice - Why More is Less
on: Google TechTalks


  • Currently 3.00/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (5087 votes)
Video format: rm       Time: 1 hour 4 minutes
Send link to a friend



Steven Pinker
Harvard University
Steven Pinker on the Colbert Report
on: Comedy Central
Entertaining segment - good fun

  • Currently 3.00/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (5635 votes)
Video format: flv       Time: 6:00
Send link to a friend



Richard Dawkins
Oxford University
The universe is queerer than we can suppose
on: TedTalks
Biologist Richard Dawkins makes a case for 'thinking the improbable' by looking at how our human frame of reference -- the things we can perceive with our five senses, and understand with our eight-pound brain -- limits our understanding of the universe. Think of it: We can't see atoms, we can't see infrared light, we can't hear ultrasonic frequencies, but we know without a doubt that they exist. What else is out there that we can't yet perceive -- what dimensions of space, what aspects of time, what forms of life? Dawkins calls the human-size frame of reference 'Middle World': between the microcosmos of atoms and the macrocosmos of the universe. Middle World thinking limits our ability to see the universe in terms of the improbable, whereas 'in the vastness of astronomical space and geological time, that which seems impossible in Middle World might turn out to be inevitable.'

  • Currently 3.00/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (5460 votes)
Video format: Adobe Flash Player 9       Time: 22:08
Send link to a friend



National Science Foundation

Briefing: Documenting Endangered Languages
on: National Science Foundation
Linguistics experts estimate that almost half of the world's 6,000-7,000 existing languages--and the cultural, linguistic and cognitive information they encapsulate--are headed for oblivion. The National Science Foundation, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Humanities, has launched a multi-year 'rescue mission' to document and preserve key languages before they become extinct. More than 70 at-risk languages will be digitally archived as part of the new Documenting Endangered Languages (DEL) program.

  • Currently 3.00/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (5889 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 3:39
Send link to a friend



J. Subramani
Brookhaven National Laboratory
Managing Depression
on: Brookhaven National Laboratory
Dr. Subramani covers signs and symptoms of depression, depression in special populations, the role of antidepressant medications in treatment, and knowing where and how to get help.

  • Currently 3.00/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (4687 votes)
Video format: rm       Time: 31 minutes
Send link to a friend



Steven Pinker
Harvard University
Interview
on: Slate
Steven Pinker is Johnstone Family Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychology at Harvard University.

  • Currently 2.99/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (5491 votes)
Video format: flv       Time: 1:00
Send link to a friend



Mark Lythgoe
the Institute of Child Health
Sci-art
on:
As a neurophysiologist and lecturer in Radiology and Physics and the Institute of Child Health and Great Ormond Street Hospital, Mark Lythgoe uses Magnetic resonance Imaging (MRI) on a regular basis. He is also particularly interested in communicating science to the public, and combines these two in some of the images in his 'sci art' collection. Here he explains the concept of sci art and shows us some of his work in this area.

  • Currently 2.99/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (3895 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 16:02
Send link to a friend





Parents Job Stress Affects Kids
on: Discovery Channel
A new study finds that children wish their parents would be less stressed from work.

  • Currently 2.99/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (6843 votes)
Video format: flv       Time: 2:15
Send link to a friend



Jim Al-Khalili

Einstein's brain: The search for genius
on: sciencelive
Jim Al-Khali and Mark Lythgoe take us on a road trip to California in search of Einstein's brain. But will getting hold of his brain really solve the mystery of his genius? Jim and Mark have some different ideas about genius which they share with us here. This lecture is part of the BA Physics and Astronomy Section webcasting programme at the BA Festival 2005.

  • Currently 2.99/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (5012 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 53:30
Send link to a friend



Richard Dawkins
Oxford University
An atheist's call to arms
on: TedTalks
The session was titled 'The Design of Life,' and the TED audience was probably expecting remarks about evolution's role in our history from biologist Richard Dawkins. Instead, he launched into a full-on appeal for atheists to make public their beliefs and to aggressively fight the incursion of religion into politics and education. Scientists and intellectuals hold very different beliefs about God from the American public, he says, yet they are cowed by the overall political environment. Dawkins' scornful tone drew strongly mixed reactions from the audience; some stood and applauded his courage. Others wondered whether his strident approach could do more harm than good. Dawkins went on to publish The God Delusion and become perhaps the world's best-known atheist.

  • Currently 2.99/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (5009 votes)
Video format: Adobe Flash Player 9       Time: 29:22:00
Send link to a friend



William Gosling
University of Bath
Intuition and emotion in science
on: sciencelive
Elizabeth Connor dives into the philosophy of science with Prof. William Gosling, treasurer of the British Association and Emeritus Professor of communications engineering at the University of Bath and Helen Haste, a vice president of the BA and psychology lecturer also at Bath. They question the place of emotion and intuition in science. Is science an exclusively rational affair? Are women really more in touch with their emotions? Does this make them better at science? Do we need to rethiink our definition of science? The two Professors share their challenging and insightful views.

  • Currently 2.99/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (5019 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 16:26
Send link to a friend



David Deutsch
Oxford University
David Deutsch: What is our Place in the Cosmos?
on: TED Talks
Legendary physicist David Deutsch back-burners the work for which he's best known -- quantum physics, quantum computing, the many-worlds theory -- to discuss a more basic topic: how to think about our species' significance in the universe. Far from being simply "chemical scum," we have the ability to gain knowledge, the importance of which he illustrates in spectacular manner. As a result, he says, we are always equipped to solve problems (including global warming). The brain contains the tools we need: knowledge, reason and creativity. It's a thrilling, and profoundly optimistic argument.

  • Currently 2.99/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (4779 votes)
Video format: flv       Time: 19:11
Send link to a friend



Jamie Ward
University College London
Synaesthesia
on: sciencelive
Liz Connor talks to Jamie Ward, psychology lecturer from University College London, about synaesthesia, a condition that leads to a peculiar mixing up of the senses. Because of the way their brains are wired, people with synaesthesia find shapes and colour in music, aromas in pictures and symphanies in works of art. Many famous artists have been diagnosed with synaesthesia but is it the cause of creativity? Can it be learnt? Is there such a thing as a perfect piece of art? They discuss these questions and many more.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (5315 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 14:10
Send link to a friend



John Onians

Cracking the real daVinci code
on: sciencelive
Liz talks to Prof. John Onians from the School of World Art Studies at the University of East Anglier - the first neuro-art historian in history. He shares his theory for how neuroscience solves some of the major art history mysteries. Why were the prehistoric cave drawings more life-like than drawings for thousands of years to come? Why does the style of painting change from era to era when the world looks much the same? How do our brains shape our art? What makes an artists brain different from a lawyer's, a banker's or a scientist's? Neuroscience goes places where art history has never had access before and both disciplines are richer for the meeting.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (5316 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 12:58
Send link to a friend



Wendy Sadler

Einstein made simple
on: sciencelive
What has relativity got to do with real life? How can you make time run slowly? Is Brownian motion any use to anyone? And what has the photoelectric effect done for the world at large? This 45 minute show celebrates 100 years since Einstein wrote his three most famous papers in 1905, and changed scientific thinking.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (4954 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 19:07
Send link to a friend





Dieting, Exercise May Shed Pounds Equally
on: Discovery Channel
When it comes to weight loss, a new study suggests eating less gives the same benefits as exercise.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (5239 votes)
Video format: flv       Time: 2:21
Send link to a friend



Michael von Korff
MacColl Institute for Healthcare Innovation
Part 4: self-management Support: Application to Depression Care
on: U. of Washington TV
Michael Von Korff identifies strategies providers can use to improve depression care using patient self-management support. This lecture was taped at the 2004 Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Clinical Research Methods Summer Session co-sponsored by the Seattle VA Epidemiologic Research and Information Center (ERIC) and the University of Washington.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (5091 votes)
Video format: qt, wm       Time: 0:55
Send link to a friend



Helen Fisher
Rutgers University
The evolution of human emotions
on: TEDtalks
Helen Fisher is an anthropologist with Rutgers University, specializing in gender differences and the evolution of human emotions. (Recorded February 2006 in Monterey, CA. Duration: 24:13

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (5034 votes)
Video format: flv       Time: 24:13:00
Send link to a friend



Bob White
University of Cambridge
Is it possible to be a scientist and religious?
on: sciencelive
Michael Marshall hosted a studio debate on the question 'Is it possible to be a scientist and religious?' He was joined by Dr Denis Alexander and Professor Bob White from the University of Cambridge, and Professor John Durant, head of the MIT Museum, all of whom combine careers in science with Christianity. They discussed whether science and religion contradict each other, whether they involve fundamentally different ways of thinking and why it is that they so often seem to be at each other's throats. The panellists dealt with Mike's questions very well, but he remains a devout atheist.

  • Currently 2.98/5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
3.0/5 (4534 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 31:49
Send link to a friend







Cosmology at YearlyKos Science Panel, Part 1

Speaker: Sean Carroll
Time: 9:46

The first half of Sean Carroll's talk on Dark Matter, Dark Energy, and the meaning of science at the YearlyKos Science Panel, August 2007.

 



Warning: reset() [function.reset]: Passed variable is not an array or object in /home/content/s/a/m/sambogoch/html/navbar.php on line 118

Warning: Variable passed to each() is not an array or object in /home/content/s/a/m/sambogoch/html/navbar.php on line 119
Previous page  1  2  Next page  
Copyright ©2007 Scitalks