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Benne Holwerda
STScI
Dust Grains In Island Universes
on: Hubble Public Talks


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Video format: Real Player       Time: 45:44:00
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Adam Greenfield
Keio University
Everyware: The dawning age of ubiquitous computing
on:
A video of the talk Adam Greenfield gave at Keio University on July 15, 2006. The topic is Adam's recently published book Everyware: The dawning age of ubiquitous computing.

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3.0/5 (4943 votes)
Video format: mpeg2       Time:
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Erik Fair

Social Computing: From Message Boards to Blogs & Beyond
on:
Bring your honey, bring a friend or come solo to the Computer History Museum on Valentine's Day. Join Usenet guru Erik Fair, virtual worlds pioneer and Yahoo! Community Strategist Randy Farmer, LinkedIn founder Reid Hoffman, and Six Apart co-founder Mena Trott, together with top Wall Street Journal columnist Kara Swisher, to hear fascinating personal stories and perspectives about social computing: yesterday, today and tomorrow. Valentine's Day surprises will abound.

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3.0/5 (3760 votes)
Video format: mpeg4 / flash video / windows media       Time:
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James Heath
California Institute of Technology
Nanosystems Biology
on: Caltech
Someday the diagnosis of disease will be done with a tiny collection of cells, rather than with invasive surgery. Caltech professor of chemistry James Heath presents the background, early successes, and the daunting challenges of coordinating the fields of nanotechnology, microfluidics, and systems biology, which may lead to a better understanding of a biological organism.

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3.0/5 (3779 votes)
Video format: rm       Time: 56 minutes
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Richard A. Muller
Berkeley
Physics10_ Lecture 10: Electricity and Magnetism II
on: Google Video
Physics 10: Physics for Future Presidents Spring 2006. Professor Richard A. Muller. The most interesting and important topics in physics, stressing conceptual understanding rather than math, with application to current events.

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3.0/5 (3990 votes)
Video format: Adobe Flash 9       Time: 1:50:50
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Robert Walsh

Living with a Star-an encounter with Robert Walsh
on: sciencelive
Currently Robert is a Senior Lecturer in Astrophysics and Mathematics at the University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK. His area of research is Solar Physics, where he uses space-based solar observatories (solar observing satellites) to monitor our closest star and then set-up sophisticated super-computer simulations to try and reproduce what we observe. He is married to Heather and has two children, Matthew (aged three) and Emma (aged 6 weeks).

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3.0/5 (4193 votes)
Video format: Quicktime       Time: 13:00
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David W. Lightfoot
National Science Foundation
The Birth and Death of Languages
on: National Science Foundation
David W. Lightfoot discusses how and why languages live and die. Even as languages are dying in unprecedented numbers, new languages are constantly emerging as existing ones diverge into different forms.

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3.0/5 (5242 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 57:53:00
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John Maynard Smith
University of Sussex
Interview
on: Slate
John Maynard Smith, who died in 2004 at the age of 84, was one of the major figures in 20th century evolutionary biology. He was professor emeritus at the University of Sussex.

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3.0/5 (4206 votes)
Video format: flv       Time: 1:00
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Andrew Newberg
University of Pennsylvania Medical School
Interview
on: Slate
Andrew Newberg teaches at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School

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3.0/5 (4232 votes)
Video format: flv       Time: 1:00
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Looking Inside Clouds
on: Jet Propulsion Laboratory
When NASA's CloudSat satellite launches, it will allow scientists to see clouds in 3-D for the first time.

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3.0/5 (3945 votes)
Video format:       Time:
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C. Johnson
University of Southern California
String Theory Part V
on: CERN
The primary emphasis of the lectures will be the study of non-perturbative regimes of string theory. The first lecture will be broad and at a general level, touching on a number of topics. The remaining lectures will be more detailed, exhibiting some key tools and phenomena which have formed the foundation for several recent advances in the field. Among these are D-branes, which will be studied from several points of view, leading to ideas such as strong/weak coupling dualities, open/closed dualities, holography, and gauge/gravity dualities. If time permits, the last lecture will discuss minimal string theories, which are simple but powerful exactly solvable systems which exhibit a range of key non-perturbative phenomena.

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3.0/5 (3953 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 1:22:03
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S. Carroll
University of Chicago
Cosmology for particle physicists Part III
on: CERN
The past few years have seen dramatic breakthroughs and spectacular and puzzling discoveries in astrophysics and cosmology. We know much about the universe, but understand very little. Open questions include the nature of the dark matter and dark energy, the origin of the matter/antimatter asymmetry, the possibility of inflation, and the role of string theory and extra dimensions in the early universe. All of these issues impact strongly on, and will be heavily influenced by, upcoming experiments in particle physics.

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3.0/5 (4314 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 1:01:04
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Harry Kroto
Sussex University
Science, A Round Peg in a Square World
on:
The lecture covers many topics from a walk through chemistry, the nature of truth and debate, the importance of education at a young age and the value of meccano!

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3.0/5 (4674 votes)
Video format: real player       Time: 40:36:00
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Michael Rabin
Harvard University
Hyper-Encryption by Virtual Satellite
on: Harvard University
Michael Rabin, the T.J. Watson, Sr. Professor of Computer Science at Harvard, confronts the failure of computer systems to provide network security and, as a solution, presents the theory of hyper-encryption.

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3.0/5 (4677 votes)
Video format: qt,mw,rm       Time: 45 minutes
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Jennifer Golbeck
University of Maryland
Social Networks, the Semantic Web, and the Future of Online Scientific Collaboration
on: Fermilab Colloquium Lectures
In this talk, I will discuss the use of Semantic Web technology for science. Then, I will describe how web-based social networks can be used to create trust and policy systems on the Semantic Web, and how that, in turn, can facilitate and improve collaboration.

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3.0/5 (4347 votes)
Video format: Real Player       Time: 1:18:19
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Peter Piot
UNAIDS
Peter Piot: AIDS: The Need for an Exceptional Response to an Unprecedented Crisis
on: World Bank
Since his early professional years as a doctor in Zaire, Dr. Peter Piot, Executive Director, UNAIDS, has witnessed first hand, the worldwide spread of AIDS.

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3.0/5 (4205 votes)
Video format: rm       Time: 59 minutes
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Max Perutz

Interview
on: The Vega Science Trust
Max Perutz discovered the structure of Haemoglobin (Nobel Prize 1962) and was the founder of the Laboratory for Molecular Biology in Cambridge, the birth place of modern molecular biology.

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3.0/5 (6814 votes)
Video format: rm       Time: 46:57:00
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Dax Fu
Brookhaven National Laboratory
Molecular Design of Transport Proteins - 416th Brookhaven Lecture by Dax Fu
on: Brookhaven National Laboratory
Molecular Design of a Metal Transporter. Metal transporters are proteins residing in cell membranes that keep the amount of zinc and other metals in the body in check by selecting a nutritional metal ion against a similar and much moreabundant toxic one. How transporter proteins achieve this remarkable sensitivity is one of the questions addressed by Fu in this lecture. June 21, 2006.

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3.0/5 (5208 votes)
Video format: rm       Time: 60 minutes
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Clive Bell
Heildberg University
Long Run Economic Costs of AIDS
on: World Bank
Most existing estimates of the macroeconomic costs of AIDS, as measured by the reduction in the growth rate of GDP, are modest. For Africa - the continent where the epidemic has hit the hardest - they range between 0.3 and 1.5 percent annually.

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3.0/5 (4108 votes)
Video format: rm       Time: 80 minutes
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Stephen Jay Gould
Harvard University
Interview
on: Google Video
Gould discusses several misconceptions that many people have about Darwin and Darwinism.

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3.0/5 (4349 votes)
Video format: flv       Time: 0:54
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Michael Pollan

Berkeley Writers at Work: Michael Pollan
on: UC Berkeley Webcasts
Michael Pollan is Knight Professor of Journalism at the Graduate School and director of the Knight Program in Science and Environmental Journalism. He is a contributing writer at the New York Times Magazine, and the author of three books: The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World; A Place of My Own; and Second Nature. For many years he served as Executive Editor of Harper's Magazine. His writing has won numerous awards, including the Reuters/World Conservation Union Global Award in Environmental Journalism, the James Beard Award, and the Genesis Award from the Humane Society of the United States.

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3.0/5 (4366 votes)
Video format:       Time: 1:23:02
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Jeff Hawkins

The PalmPilot Story
on:
The late 1980s and early 1990s buzzed with corporations and startups trying to develop portable computers that used a pen as the means of interaction. By late 1993, every one of these efforts had failed. Though running out of funding, one of these startups, Palm Computing, went on to launch the Pilot organizer and Palm operating system, which triggered the handheld computing industry. In this talk, Jeff Hawkins, Donna Dubinsky, and Ed Colligan discuss the roots of handheld computing, how Palm learned from failure, and the challenges of battling conventional technology wisdom. Andrea Butter, former Palm marketing executive and co-author of Piloting Palm will facilitate the discussion.

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3.0/5 (3424 votes)
Video format: windows media       Time:
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Richard F. Lyon

Pixels and Me
on:
Computers have revolutionized image media. Richard Lyon, one of the current pioneers of digital cameras, has found that several generations of pioneers in this field have been entangled with the terms picture element and pixel and that studying the history of the terminology is a fruitful approach to the history of the people and technology. Vladimir Zworykin's television research group at RCA popularized the term picture element in the 1930s, while the TV researchers at Bell Labs ignored that term, preferring image element. Fred Billingsley and others at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed computerized image processing and propagated the term pixel in the 1960s, while image processing researchers at Bell Labs ignored that term, preferring pel. In the early 1970s, pixel was spread through computer image processing publications from NASA, USC, IBM, Stanford, University of Missouri, and other places, eventually coming to be applied to elements of image sensor hardware, such as Lyon's optical mouse in 1980 and digital camera sensors more recently. Many of the people involved in this complex history have provided their personal recollections and documents to help piece the story together, and more such inputs will be solicited from the Computer History Museum audience.

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Video format: flash video / windows media       Time:
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Tony Benn

Science is Knowledge and Knowledge is Power A Discussion with Tony Benn
on: The Vega Science Trust
In this lively and entertaining interview, former UK Minister for Science Tony Benn discusses the interaction between scientists and politicians in an interview with Sir Harry Kroto.

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3.0/5 (6727 votes)
Video format: rm       Time: 32:03:00
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Harry Kroto
Sussex University
Science, A Round Peg in a Square World
on: The Vega Science Trust
The lecture covers many topics from a walk through chemistry, the nature of truth and debate, the importance of education at a young age and the value of meccano!

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3.0/5 (4835 votes)
Video format: rm       Time: 40:36:00
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The Pleasure of Finding Things Out

Speaker: Richard Feynman
Time: 50 minutes

Fifty minutes of PURE Feynman! This is the original Horizon Nova interview - essential for any Feynman fan... and for everyone else too!
THE PLEASURE OF FINDING THINGS OUT was filmed in 1981 and will delight and inspire anyone who would like to share something of the joys of scientific discovery. Feynman is a master storyteller, and his tales -- about childhood, Los Alamos, or how he won a Nobel Prize -- are a vivid and entertaining insight into the mind of a great scientist at work and play.
'The 1981 Feynman Horizon is the best science program I have ever seen. This is not just my opinion - it is also the opinion of many of the best scientists that I know who have seen the program... It should be mandatory viewing for all students whether they be science or arts students.' - Professor Sir Harry Kroto, Nobel Prize for Chemistry

 



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