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Robert Barlow
State University of New York
Human Blindness: How Horseshoe Crabs May Lead to Cures
on: WGBH Forum
Horseshoe crab eyes have told us a great deal about how we see. Their ability to see better at night is a remarkable property we do not possess.

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Video format: rm       Time: 59:53:00
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Nicolas Brunel

Parameter Estimation of ODE's with Regression Splines: Application to Biological Networks
on:
The construction and the estimation of quantitative models of gene regulatory networks and metabolic networks is one of the task of Systems Biology. Such models are useful because they provide tools for simulating and predicting biological systems. Various approaches have been proposed, such as graphical models , Bayesian dynamical models or Ordinary Differential Equations (ODE's) .

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Video format:       Time: 19:01
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J. Robin Warren
Australia
Helicobacter - The Ease and Difficulty of a New Discovery
on: Nobelprize.org
J. Robin Warren held his Nobel Lecture December 8, 2005, at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. He was presented by Professor Bo Angelin, Member of the Nobel Committee for Physiology or Medicine.

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Video format: rm       Time: 40 minutes
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David Crease

The Good, the bad and the undrinkable: the science of beer
on: sciencelive
David is a master Brewer from Woodfords. He has a background in chemistry but turned to brewing after joining the home brewers club. He chats to charlotte about the brewing process, letting her taste some malt and rub some hops. He also talks about many of the rigorous scientific tests breweries have to carry out on their beer to check for contamination or wild yeast strains

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Video format: Real Player       Time: 11:57
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David W. Lightfoot
National Science Foundation
The Birth and Death of Languages
on: National Science Foundation
David W. Lightfoot discusses how and why languages live and die. Even as languages are dying in unprecedented numbers, new languages are constantly emerging as existing ones diverge into different forms.

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Video format: Real Player       Time: 57:53:00
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Michael Feuer
NRC
The Future of Education Research and Policy
on: WGBH Forum
Michael J. Feuer, PhD of the National Research Council presents the second in a series of three lectures that examine the links between cognitive science and the science of education policy as a means of developing more rational programs of educational improvement and more reasonable expectations for reform and research.

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Video format: rm       Time: 1:10:59
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Rover Flight Director Report
on: Jet Propulsion Laboratory
This week marks Opportunity's third anniversary on Mars. The rover joins its twin, Spirit, in three years of continuous surface operations on the red planet.

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Jason Hickey
California Institute of Technology
Structured Programming for Reliable Systems
on: Caltech
Dr. Jason Hickey, Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Caltech, presented this lecture as part of the 0.1 Seminar series. He discusses the basic issues in programming language design, and why the design automation problem remains unsolved despite considerable progress in the past 50 years. He also takes a brief look at the history of programming languages, including C and Scheme, and presents examples of work in open design platforms.

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Video format: rm       Time: 48 minutes
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News from Saturn
on: Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Cassini flew by Titan on January 13th and took a stunning image over Titan's north pole.

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Andrei Linde
Stanford University
Inflation, Dark Energy, and the Fate of the Universe'
on: Fermilab Colloquium Lectures


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Video format: Real Player       Time: 1:30:54
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Andrew Fire
Stanford University
Gene Silencing by Double-Stranded RNA
on: Nobelprize.org
Andrew Z. Fire delivered his Nobel Lecture on 8 December 2006 at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm. He was introduced by Professor Bertil Daneholt, Chairman of the Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet.

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3.0/5 (3838 votes)
Video format: rm       Time: 47 minutes
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Federico Faggin

35th Anniversary of the Intel(r) 4004 Microprocessor
on:
The Computer History Museum and the Intel Museum invite you to mark the 35th anniversary of one of the most important products in technology history. Introduced in November 1971, the Intel(r) 4004 microprocessor was an early and significant commercial product to embody computer architecture within a silicon device. And it started an electronics revolution that changed our world.

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Video format: windows media       Time:
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Carolin Crawford

Was the Universe Made for Us?
on: sciencelive
Matt Cunningham chats to Dr Carolin Crawford and Prof Bernard Carr on whether the Universe was made for us? The characteristics of the Universe are just right to allow human life to have evolved, what does this imply and what can it tell us about the Universe around us.

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Video format: Real Player       Time: 10:18
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Flying Over Spirit's Work Site
on: Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Images of the 'Columbia Hills' region inside Mars' Gusev Crater, taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, provided detailed, three-dimensional information that was used to create this animation of a hypothetical flyover. NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit has been exploring this range of hills since 2004.

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Video format: Quicktime       Time:
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Spencer Wells
National Geographic Society
The Journey of Man: A Genetic Odyssey
on: Fermilab Colloquium Lectures


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Video format: Real Player       Time: 1:07:47
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Raymond B. Seed

Lessons from Hurricane Katrina: Can We Save California's Delta?
on: UC Berkeley Webcasts
Professor Ray Seed co-chairs the joint State-Federal Technical Advisory Committee for assessment of levee-related risk for the State of California. Professor Seed also led the post-Katrina investigation, and will present his team's analysis of what went wrong and how we in California can learn from these mistakes.

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Video format:       Time: 1:00:11
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Roy J. Glauber

Interview
on: The Vega Science Trust
Nobel Prize in Physics 2005 for his contribution to the quantum theory of optical coherence

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K.C. Cole
L.A. Times
Words Matter, A Science Writing Symposium
on: Caltech
On January 21, a panel of prominent science writers addressed the challenges of communicating technical information to general audiences as part of the Words Matter Science Writing program. Panelists included K.C. Cole, Los Angeles Times science writer ; Kip Thorne, Feynman Professor of Theoretical Physics at Caltech; and Lord Robert Winston, professor of fertility studies at Imperial College, London.

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Video format: rm       Time: 87 minutes
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Donald S. Cohen
California Institute of Technology
Diffusion-Mediated Regulation In Endocrine Cell Networks
on: Caltech
Donald S. Cohen, Charles Lee Powell Professor of Applied Mathematics, Emeritus, Caltech; Danny Petrasek, Senior Research Fellow, Applied and Computational Mathematics, Caltech; and William Goodman, Professor of Medicine, UCLA, presented this lecture as part of the 0.1 Seminar series. They discuss a computational model that demonstrates diffusion-mediated regulation and that shows qualitative agreement with published experimental results. Such a signaling mechanism may regulate other networks with similar biochemical and geometric properties.

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Video format: rm       Time: 37 minutes
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Jeff Hawkins

The PalmPilot Story
on:
The late 1980s and early 1990s buzzed with corporations and startups trying to develop portable computers that used a pen as the means of interaction. By late 1993, every one of these efforts had failed. Though running out of funding, one of these startups, Palm Computing, went on to launch the Pilot organizer and Palm operating system, which triggered the handheld computing industry. In this talk, Jeff Hawkins, Donna Dubinsky, and Ed Colligan discuss the roots of handheld computing, how Palm learned from failure, and the challenges of battling conventional technology wisdom. Andrea Butter, former Palm marketing executive and co-author of Piloting Palm will facilitate the discussion.

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Video format: windows media       Time:
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Robert Walsh

Living with a Star-an encounter with Robert Walsh
on: sciencelive
Currently Robert is a Senior Lecturer in Astrophysics and Mathematics at the University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK. His area of research is Solar Physics, where he uses space-based solar observatories (solar observing satellites) to monitor our closest star and then set-up sophisticated super-computer simulations to try and reproduce what we observe. He is married to Heather and has two children, Matthew (aged three) and Emma (aged 6 weeks).

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Video format: Quicktime       Time: 13:00
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Robert Brandenberger
Brown University
Basics of Cosmology for String Theorists
on: Summer School on Strings, Gravity and Cosmology
Dr. Robert Brandenberger presented a series of 4 lectures on Basics of Cosmology for String Theorists at the PIMS Summer School on Strings, Gravity & and Cosmology. When you get to the page, click on 'videos'.

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Video format: Real Player       Time: 1:10:40
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Michael Rabin
Harvard University
Hyper-Encryption by Virtual Satellite
on: Harvard University
Michael Rabin, the T.J. Watson, Sr. Professor of Computer Science at Harvard, confronts the failure of computer systems to provide network security and, as a solution, presents the theory of hyper-encryption.

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Video format: qt,mw,rm       Time: 45 minutes
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Dr.Ken Farquhar

Science in a Suitcase
on: sciencelive
Dr Ken Farquhar and his able assistant Ian Walker take over ScienceLive to demonstrate 'Science in a Suitcase'. After throwing out Matt they demonstrate 'sideways gravity' - how moving objects to the side will cause some objects to fall straight down. They also show us the British Space mission, involving an electric drill, beach balls and a variety of exciting planetary objects!! They then show us to spin water around their head without making a mess on the floor. A must for all of those still young at heart!!

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Video format: Real Player       Time: 11:51
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Harlan Anderson

The Mouse That Roared: PDP-1 Celebration Event
on:
Introduced in 1959, the DEC PDP-1 computer is truly the mouse that roared, a powerful, easy-to-operate computer with a host of new abilities that allowed its users to interact with a computer all to themselves. This was a novelty in the early 1960s when mainframe-based batch processing was the norm and the idea of a computer dedicated to a single-user was heretical, akin to having a personal aircraft carrier.

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Video format: mpeg4 / flash video / windows media       Time:
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The Pleasure of Finding Things Out

Speaker: Richard Feynman
Time: 50 minutes

Fifty minutes of PURE Feynman! This is the original Horizon Nova interview - essential for any Feynman fan... and for everyone else too!
THE PLEASURE OF FINDING THINGS OUT was filmed in 1981 and will delight and inspire anyone who would like to share something of the joys of scientific discovery. Feynman is a master storyteller, and his tales -- about childhood, Los Alamos, or how he won a Nobel Prize -- are a vivid and entertaining insight into the mind of a great scientist at work and play.
'The 1981 Feynman Horizon is the best science program I have ever seen. This is not just my opinion - it is also the opinion of many of the best scientists that I know who have seen the program... It should be mandatory viewing for all students whether they be science or arts students.' - Professor Sir Harry Kroto, Nobel Prize for Chemistry

 



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