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Al Gore
Columbia University

on: NYU Law School


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Video format: rm       Time: 1 hour
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Ian Jordan
STScl
Distant Screens: From Extrasolar Planets to Eclipsing the North Star
on: Hubble Public Talks


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Video format: Real Player       Time: 1:03:21
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Aaron Klug

Interview
on:
Nobel Prize 1982 for his development of crystallographic electron microscopy and his structural elucidation of biologically important nucleic acid-protein complexes.'

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Video format: real player       Time:
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Michael Pollan

Berkeley Writers at Work: Michael Pollan
on: UC Berkeley Webcasts
Michael Pollan is Knight Professor of Journalism at the Graduate School and director of the Knight Program in Science and Environmental Journalism. He is a contributing writer at the New York Times Magazine, and the author of three books: The Botany of Desire: A Plant's-Eye View of the World; A Place of My Own; and Second Nature. For many years he served as Executive Editor of Harper's Magazine. His writing has won numerous awards, including the Reuters/World Conservation Union Global Award in Environmental Journalism, the James Beard Award, and the Genesis Award from the Humane Society of the United States.

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Video format:       Time: 1:23:02
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Donald Knuth

Questions Answered
on: Computer History Museum
Stump the Professor! Don't miss this opportunity to ask Don Knuth anything and everything you ever wanted to know about computer programming. He will spontaneously answer all questions posed by the audience.

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Video format: windows media       Time:
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Donald S. Cohen
California Institute of Technology
Diffusion-Mediated Regulation In Endocrine Cell Networks
on: Caltech
Donald S. Cohen, Charles Lee Powell Professor of Applied Mathematics, Emeritus, Caltech; Danny Petrasek, Senior Research Fellow, Applied and Computational Mathematics, Caltech; and William Goodman, Professor of Medicine, UCLA, presented this lecture as part of the 0.1 Seminar series. They discuss a computational model that demonstrates diffusion-mediated regulation and that shows qualitative agreement with published experimental results. Such a signaling mechanism may regulate other networks with similar biochemical and geometric properties.

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Video format: rm       Time: 37 minutes
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Carole Baldwin
Smithsonian
Journey to the Galapagos
on: WGBH Forum
Dr. Baldwin explored 3,000 feet below the ocean surface to identify a colorful array of rarely seen animals and plants,

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Video format: rm       Time: 53:25:00
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Robert Hecht-Nielsen
UCSD
The Mechanism of Thought
on: Google Video
Lecture 3 of 12 of IBM Research's Almaden Institute Conference on Cognitive Computing

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Video format: Adobe Flash 9       Time: 54:33:00
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Al Gore

Global Climate Change
on: UC Berkeley Webcasts
Al Gore speaks with Orville Schell, Dean of the Graduate School of Journalism, following a presentation on global climate change.

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Video format:       Time: 0:47:08
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Jason Hickey
California Institute of Technology
Structured Programming for Reliable Systems
on: Caltech
Dr. Jason Hickey, Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Caltech, presented this lecture as part of the 0.1 Seminar series. He discusses the basic issues in programming language design, and why the design automation problem remains unsolved despite considerable progress in the past 50 years. He also takes a brief look at the history of programming languages, including C and Scheme, and presents examples of work in open design platforms.

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Video format: rm       Time: 48 minutes
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Moshe Vardi
Rice University
Logic in Computer Science
on: U. of Washington TV
During the past thirty years there has been extensive interaction between logic and computer science. The argument is that logic plays a fundamental role in computer science, similar to that played by calculus in the physical sciences and traditional engineering disciplines.

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Video format: qt, wm       Time: 0:55
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Roger Kornberg
Stanford University
The Molecular Basis of Eukaryotic Transcription
on: Nobelprize.org
Roger Kornberg delivered his Nobel Lecture on 8 December 2006 at Aula Magna, Stockholm University. He was introduced by Professor HŒkan Wennerstršm, Chairman of the Nobel Committee for Chemistry.

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Video format: rm       Time: 43 minutes
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Keith Hansen
ACT Africa
Follow-Up Video Conference of the Addis Ababa Faith-based Organizations and NAC Workshop
on: World Bank
To support the implementation of its HIV/AIDS strategy, the World Bank has established a multisectoral AIDS Campaign Team for Africa (ACTafrica).

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Video format: rm       Time: 180 minutes
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Douglas. D Osheroff

Interview
on: The Vega Science Trust
Douglas D. Oshe.roff and Robert C. Richardson, USA shared the Nobel Prize for Physics with David M. Lee, USA in 1996 'for their discovery of superfluidity in helium-3

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Donald Kennedy
AAAS
Evolution - AAAS Breakthrough of 2005
on: AAAS and Biocompare
Breakthrough of the Year: Evolution in Action- In studies of organisms ranging from the avian flu virus to the chimpanzee, scientists drove home a simple and timely message: Evolution works

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Video format: qt, flv       Time: 5:00
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Carol Bartz

An Evening with Carol Bartz
on:
Please join us for the Computer History Museum's ongoing Odysseys in Technology series featuring Carol Bartz, Chairman, CEO, and President of Autodesk, Inc. in conversation with veteran Silicon Valley author and journalist Michael Malone.

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Video format: flash video / windows media       Time:
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Helene Benveniste
Brookhaven National Laboratory
392nd Brookhaven Lecture March 18, 2004 (55 min.)
on: Brookhaven National Laboratory
Helene Benveniste, BNL Associate Laboratory Director for Life Sciences, presents Experimental Multi-modality Imaging: What Imaging Can Tell Us About Diseases.

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Video format: rm       Time: 60 minutes
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Shane Ross
California Institute of Technology
Shane Ross: The Interplanetary Transport Network
on: Caltech
Shane Ross, graduate student in control and dynamical systems at Caltech, discussed how to identify and traverse a vast array of low-energy passageways that winds around the sun, planets, and moons that is created by the competing gravitational pull between celestial bodies. Space travel along these corridors would slash the amount of fuel needed to explore and develop our solar system.

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Video format: rm       Time: 39 minutes
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Jim Gibbons

The Rise of Silicon Valley: From Shockley Labs to Fairchild Semiconductor
on:
On February 13, 1956, co-inventor of the transistor William Shockley formally announced the establishment of Shockley Labs, Silicon Valley's first semiconductor company. In their modest Quonset hut laboratory on San Antonio Avenue in Mountain View, Shockley's hand-picked team of some of the nation's brightest young scientists and engineers developed innovative technologies and ideas that forever changed the way we live, work and play. To celebrate the 50th anniversary of this pivotal event in the history of our region, join technology historian Michael Riordan in a conversation between early Shockley employees and associates Jim Gibbons, Jay Last, Hans Queisser, and Harry Sello.

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Video format: mpeg4 / flash video / windows media       Time:
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Kathleen Dudzinski
Dolphin Communication Project
Eavesdropping on Dolphins
on: WGBH Forum
Following a screening of the IMAX Film Dolphins, Dr. Kathleen Dudzinski, Director of the Dolphin Communication Project at Mystic Aquarium & Institute for Exploration, presents details from her 14 years of studying dolphin communication in the Bahamas, Japan and Honduras.

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Video format: rm       Time: 49:37:00
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What's up for April
on: Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Take a 2-minute guided tour on where to look in the night sky for this month's stunning views. No telescopes required.

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Video format: Macromedia Flash Player 8, Quicktime       Time: 2:00
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Scott Weber
NEAQ
Feathers, Fins, and Scales: Aquatic Animal Medicine
on: WGBH Forum
Learn about the new field of aquatic animal medicine and aquatic animal veterinarians.

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Video format: rm       Time: 1:07:52
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Ted Baltz
SLAC
Sloving the Dark Matter Problem
on: Fermilab Colloquium Lectures
Cosmological observations have firmly established that the majority of matter in the universe is of an unknown type, called 'dark matter'. A compelling hypothesis is that the dark matter consists of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in the mass range around 100 GeV. If the WIMP hypothesis is correct, such particles could be created and studied at accelerators. Furthermore they could be directly detected as the primary component of our galaxy. Solving the dark matter problem requires that the connection be made between the two. We describe some theoretical and experimental avenues that might lead to this connection.

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Video format: Real Player       Time: 1:07:21
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Harry Kroto
Florida State University
Astrophysics Lecture 5: Molecular Radio Astronomy and IR Techniques
on: Vega Science Trust
The development of molecular radio astronomy and infra red techniques and the information they yield on the composition of the interstellar medium: interstellar clouds, stellar envelopes etc.

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Xiao-Gang Wen
Massachusetts Institute of Technology and KITP
Tutorial and Discussion on Topologically Ordered States
on: Kavli Institute
From KITP program on Strongly Correlated Phases in Condensed Matter and Degenerate Atomic Systems

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Video format: rm       Time: 55:00:00
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The Pleasure of Finding Things Out

Speaker: Richard Feynman
Time: 50 minutes

Fifty minutes of PURE Feynman! This is the original Horizon Nova interview - essential for any Feynman fan... and for everyone else too!
THE PLEASURE OF FINDING THINGS OUT was filmed in 1981 and will delight and inspire anyone who would like to share something of the joys of scientific discovery. Feynman is a master storyteller, and his tales -- about childhood, Los Alamos, or how he won a Nobel Prize -- are a vivid and entertaining insight into the mind of a great scientist at work and play.
'The 1981 Feynman Horizon is the best science program I have ever seen. This is not just my opinion - it is also the opinion of many of the best scientists that I know who have seen the program... It should be mandatory viewing for all students whether they be science or arts students.' - Professor Sir Harry Kroto, Nobel Prize for Chemistry

 



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